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1) What are the system requirements for your programs?
Our programs make use of Graphics32, which is supported bij all 32-bit MS Windows (95/98/NT/2000/XP) systems. We developed them on an XP machine and tested with succes on MS Windows 98, MS Windows 2000 and MS Windows XP. Furthermore you need approx. 12 MB free space on your Hard Drive, a mouse and your screen resolution should be at least 800x600. The most important requirement is of course that you have a keyboard that you can connect to your PC's sound card through a MIDI-cable! The software generates pitches ranging from the 2nd ledger line below the bass clef (C) until the 3d ledger line above the treble clef (E). Please download our MIDI-Checker first to verify if our software will work with your PC and keyboard.
 
2) Does the software run on a Macintosh?
The software only works on PC's with Microsoft Windows on it. Unfortunately for other people, we are not planning to develop any versions for other Operating Systems.
 
3) The software doesn't give me correct feedback(, but I know I'm right)!
The way our software interprets MIDI-messages works for most USB/MIDI-keyboards. If our software doesn't work for you, it probably means we'd have to update our software. Download and run our MIDI-Checker from our website and follow instructions. When we receive your feedback, we will make changes as soon as possible.
 
4) Does your program offer any theoretic support?
 
The only theoretic support we offer is what you find on this page. We might extend this information in the future, but the program itself we wanted to keep it plain and simple and very easy to use. Other programs often are so full with options that you need a few months to learn how to use it, we wanted to prevent that. Besides the program is intended for people how want to improve their sight reading, so some knowledge about music theory is assumed.
 
5) Do you have any tips for reading flat keys?
 
To find what flat key you're in, just take the next to the last flat. In this example Ab (flat) Major is the key! The exception is F, which has only 1 flat!
 
6) How do I recognize keys with sharps?
 
To find what sharp key you're in, just go half step above the last sharp. In this example B Major is the key!
 
7) Is there a way to speed up my note recognition in the treble clef?
 
It is fairly easy to instantly see if a note is on a line and on which line it is. Learn these letters upward and downward and you'll see results fast!
It is fairly easy to instantly see if a note is on a space and on which space it is. Learn these letters upward and downward and you'll see results fast!
 
8) Is there a way to speed up my note recognition in the bass clef?
 
It is fairly easy to instantly see if a note is on a line and on which line it is. Learn these letters upward and downward and you'll see results fast!
It is fairly easy to instantly see if a note is on a space and on which space it is. Learn these letters upward and downward and you'll see results fast!
 
9) How do I recognize intervals?
 
Can you immediately see that both of these notes are in a space (and not on a line)? Then you know already that this interval is ODD! In this case you're looking at a fifth. The same goes if both notes are on a line!
Do you see that one note is on a line and the other in a space? Or, do you see that not both notes are on a line or in a space? Then you know that this interval is EVEN! This is a sixth.
 
10) What intervals are there?
 
Half steps Most common names
0 Perfect unison (not included in the program)
1 Minor second
2 Major second
3 Minor third
4 Major third
5 Perfect fourth
6 Diminished fifth / Augmented fourth
7 Perfect fifth
8 Minor sixth / Augmented fifth
9 Major sixth
10 Minor seventh / Augmented sixth
11 Major seventh
12 Perfect octave
 
11) Did you know that minor, major, augmented and diminished chords are just a stack of the same intervals?
 
If you see 2 thirds stacked upon each other, than you know that you're looking at one of the four basic chords in root position! In this case Ab (flat) major! Knowing your primary and secundary chords will help you recognize these chords fast!
 
If you see a fourth stacked upon a third, than you know that you're looking at one of the four basic chords in it's 1st inversion! In this case Gb (flat) major! Additionally you can immediately identify the top note as the ROOT note!
 
If you see a third stacked upon a fourth, than you know that you're looking at one of the four basic chords in it's 2nd inversion! In this case G major! Additionally you can immediately identify the middle note as the ROOT note!
 
12) Are you sure this chord/interval is displayed correctly?
 
The software has been developed with the most care and although it has been tested extensively, we can't garantee that all of the chords/intervals are displayed correctly. If you let us know which chord/interval is wrong and in which octave and key it is displayed, we will correct it in a future version. We need this information to be able to debug the software.
 

 
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